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Neurontin Dosage: How much is too much? 

Neurontin dosage: The recommended amounts
 

Front Image - GABAPENTINNeurontin dosage for Epilepsy 

Adults and children 12 years of age and older: 

The usual recommended starting Neurontin dosage is 300 mg taken three times a day.  After that initial starting dosage the usual range is 900 to 1800 mg divided evenly into three doses. 

Children 3 years to 12 years of age:

The usual recommended starting Neurontin dosage for young children should be calculated according to their weight and initially is 10 to 15 mg per 2.2 pounds of body weight. The dosage is then increased over a period of three days to 40 mg per 2.2 pounds for children ages three to four, and 25 to 35 mg per 2.2 pounds for children ages five and older.  The total Neurontin dosage is always evenly divided into three doses taken throughout the day. 

Neurontin dosage for pain following a shingles attack 

The typical starting dosage of Neurontin is a single 300 mg dose on the first day, two 300 mg doses on the second day and three 300 mg dosages on the third day.  The doctor will occasionally increase the daily Neurontin dosage to as much as 1800 mg evenly divided into three doses.  The doctor may lower your medication to a lower level if you have poor kidney function, regardless of whether you are taking this seizure medication for epilepsy or pain.  Also, your doctor may want to discontinue this seizure medication at some point in time or may want to add another drug to your medication therapy.  If this occurs your doctor will usually decrease the Neurontin dosage over a period of one week. 

Neurontin overdosage:

Any seizure medication taken in excess may have very serious consequences.  If you suspect a possible overdose of Neurontin you should seek medical attention immediately. 

Symptoms of Neurontin overdosage may include: 

Diarrhea, double vision, drowsiness, lethargy or slurred speech

Front Image - GABAPENTIN neurontinSome information from The PDR Pocket Guide to Prescription Drugs

Additional information and webpage by Paul Susic M.A. Licensed Psychologist Ph.D Candidate (Health and Geriatric Psychologist)  

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